San Antonio’s Hike and Bike Trail

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Reid Hackney earned his bachelor of science at Penn State and served in senior executive positions in several companies, including A’GACI in San Antonio, Texas, and the Ascena Retail Group in Suffern, Nevada. He played significant roles in the impressive growth of both companies. Now retired, Reid Hackney enjoys hiking and cycling in the San Antonio area, including on the Missions Hike and Bike Trail in San Antonio.

The Missions Hike and Bike Trail runs along the San Antonio River and connects the historic Alamo with four missions to the south. The distance from one mission to the next is about two miles or so, and there are restrooms, picnic tables, and water fountains along the way. As the trail is mostly flat, it is an easy ride or walk for most. On the way, you’ll pass over bridges and through meadows filled with wildflowers and dotted with oaks.

After the Alamo, you’ll reach Mission Concepcion, with its robust stone church, then Mission San Jose with its still-standing cloister walls and decorated facade. There are also the remains of an irrigation system as well as a bell tower at Mission San Juan. Last, at Mission Espada, you’ll see a dam and an aqueduct, remnants of a once prosperous agricultural area. The trail route is out and back, and bicycles are available for rent. If visiting during San Antonio’s hot summer, it is important to bring water plenty of water.

Ensuring a Proper Boot Fit When Hiking

 

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Hiking Boots
Image: rei.com

With a background as a retail executive, Reid Hackney oversaw a full range of accounting and financial functions spanning distribution, logistics, and imports while working with a major retail brand. Also an outdoors enthusiast, Reid Hackney enjoys activities such as hiking and cycling in his free time.

When taking a hiking or backpacking excursion that extends more than a couple hours, one of major factor that comes into play is the fit of the footwear. As a rule, hiking shoes require a certain amount of breaking in, given that they will be traversing often-rugged and -uneven terrain. Even a slightly off fit will be noticeable as the miles progress in the form of tender feet and blisters.

To break in a new pair of hiking shoes, wear them around the house and in everyday activities as much as possible. Wearing the same socks as you plan to hike in, take them on extended walks and test them out. In cases of “hot spots” forming, apply moleskin liberally to protect the feet from blisters.

After a period of time, a twofold process will occur of the feet adapting to the boot and the footwear adapting to the contours of the foot. In cases where a good fit simply does not develop, swap them for a better-fitting pair before a major hike.